Cloud Street

Monday, March 27, 2006

We are bored in the city

Et la piscine de la rue des Fillettes. Et le commissariat de police de la rue du Rendez-Vous. La clinique médico-chirurgicale et le bureau de placement gratuit du quai des Orfèvres. Les fleurs artificielles de la rue du Soleil. L'hôtel des Caves du Château, le bar de l'Océan et le café du Va et Vient. L'hôtel de l'Epoque.

Et l'étrange statue du Docteur Philippe Pinel, bienfaiteur des aliénés, dans les derniers soirs de l'été. Explorer Paris.


The early situationists, following Chtcheglov's lead, turned urban wandering into a form of political/psychological exploration, a group encounter with the city mediated only by alcohol. At a less exalted level, I've long been fascinated by the kind of odd urban poetry evoked here, in Manchester as much as Paris, and by the changing articulation of city space: established cities are a slow-motion example of Marx's dictum about how we make our lives within conditions we have inherited. So it's easy to see how well this could work:
Socialight lets you put virtual "sticky" notes called StickyShadows anywhere in the real world. Share pictures, notes and more using your cell phone.
But - for all that the site says about restricting access to Groups and Contacts - it's also easy to see how very badly it could work.
* I leave a note for all my friends at the mall to let them know where I'm hanging out. All my friends in the area see it.
* A woman shows all her close friends the tree under which she had her first kiss.
* An entire neighborhood gets together and documents all the unwanted litter they find in an effort to share ownership of a community problem.
* A food-lover uses Socialight to share her thoughts on the amazing vanilla milkshakes at a new shop.
* The neighborhood historian creates her own walking tour for others to follow.
* A group of friends create their own scavenger hunt.
* A tourist takes place-based notes about stores in a shopping district, only for himself, for a time when he returns to the same city.
* A small business places StickyShadows that its customers would be interested in finding.
* A band promotes an upcoming show by leaving a StickyShadow outside the venue.
It was all going so well (although I did wonder why that entire neighbourhood couldn't just pick up the litter) right up to the last two. Advertising - yep, that's just what we all want more of in our urban lives. Lots of nice intrusive advertising.

Anne:
The worst thing about taking-for-granted that our experiences with the city and each other will be "enriched" by more data, by more information, by making the invisible visible, etc., is that we never have to account for or be accountable to how.
More specifically, there's a huge difference between enabling conversation and enabling people to be informed - in other words, between talking-with and being-talked-at. Social software is all about conversation - about enabling people to talk together. Moreover, any conversation is defined as much by what it shuts out as what it includes; it's hard to listen to the people you want to talk with when you're being talked at. Even setting aside the information-overload potential of all those overlapping groups (do I need to know where so-and-so had her first kiss? do I need to know now?), it's clear that Socialight is trying to serve two ends which are not only incompatible but opposed - and only one of which pays money. Which is probably why, even though the technology is still in beta, I already feel that using it constructively would be going against the grain.

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